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Tuesday, 18 April 2017

FSc ICS FA Intermediate English Parts of Speech Types of Adverb

FSc ICS FA Intermediate English Parts of Speech Types of Adverb

Adverb

A word or groups of words that qualifies anything accept a noun or a pronoun is called adverb. It is a word that is used to change or qualify the meaning of an adjective, a verb, a clause, or another verb. e.g. He ran fast. Please talk sensibly.

Adverbs are classified on the basis of information it gives.

Types of Adverb

  • Simple Adverb
  • Interrogative Adverb
  • Relative Adverb


Simple Adverb
Simple Adverb is classified into:

Adverb of manner
Adverb of manner tells us about manner of how something is done or happens in the sentence. The adverb which answer the questions how or in what manner. Such types of adverb end with ‘ly’ such as cheerfully, badly, quickly, etc.
Adverb of Place
Adverb of place tells us about the where something is done or happens in the sentence. This type of adverb which answer the question ‘where’. e.g. here, outside, above, inside, etc.
Adverb of time
Adverb of time tells us about time of happenings or time of something is done in the sentence. These type of adverb answer the question ’when’. Adverbs of time are already, afterwards, immediately, always, last month, etc.
Adverb of frequency
Adverb of frequency tells us about how often something is done or happens is the sentence. The adverb which answers the questions ‘how often’. e.g. again, frequently, generally, ever, hardly ever, nearly, nearly always, always, occasionally, often, rarely, etc.
Adverb of Quantity
Adverb of frequency tells us about the level or extent of something is done or happens is the sentence. The adverb which answers the questions ‘to what extent’, ‘to what degree’, or ‘how much’. e.g. almost, nearly, quite, much, really, too, very, so, etc.

Interrogative Adverb
Interrogative adverb is used to ask questions. These includes why, when, where and how. When did he come? Where is your brother?

Relative Adverb
When interrogative adverbs are used in a ‘relative sense’. They are called relative adverb. These includes when, where and why. This is where we play. This is the place where we met.

Written by: Asad Hussain

Monday, 17 April 2017

FSc ICS FA Intermediate English Parts of Speech Types of Preposition

FSc ICS FA Intermediate English Parts of Speech Types of Preposition

Preposition

A word or group of words placed before a noun or a pronoun to show what one person or thing has to do with another person or thing is called preposition. e.g. A house on a hill.

Types of preposition

  • Preposition of time
  • Preposition of place
  • Preposition of direction
  • Preposition phrase


Preposition of time
It is used to indicate time of an action or time relationship between nouns in the sentence. e.g.  at, to, in, etc. I go to school daily at 7 ‘o clock.

Preposition of place
It is used to show where something is located. e.g. at, in, on, while, near, over, under, between, behind, etc. Book is on the table.

Preposition of direction
It is used to indicate the direction of someone or something in the sentence. e.g. over, under, to, on, into, in, onto, right, left, etc. The car is going into the tunnel.

Preposition phrase
It is a group of words beginning with a preposition and ending with a noun or pronoun. The noun or pronoun is the object of the preposition. They live on the corner.

Written by: Asad Hussain

FSc ICS FA Intermediate English Parts of Speech Types of Conjunction

FSc ICS FA Intermediate English Parts of Speech Types of Conjunction

Conjunction

A word that joins one word to another word, phrase or sentence is called conjunction. e.g. We ate fish and chips. I like it but I can't afford it.

Types of conjunction

  • Coordinating conjunction
  • Correlative conjunction
  • Subordinating conjunction


Coordinating conjunction
Coordinating conjunction joins sentences or words of similar values or equal ranks. e.g. and, but, for, or, not. He is intelligent but moody.

Correlative conjunction
Correlative conjunctions are used in pairs. They are similar to coordinating conjunction as they are used to join sentence that are similar in ranks. e.g. Both...and, either....or, neither....nor, not only...but also. Both Asad and Usama are players.

Subordinating conjunction
Subordinating conjunction joins a dependent clause to a main clause in a sentence. e.g. Because, after, if, since, that, when, where, although, as, as if, unless, before, though, till, while, than. He likes to read while it rains.

Written by: Asad Hussain

Thursday, 13 April 2017

BS (Hons) Chemistry Past Papers Semester 1 Chemistry I (Physical Chemistry)

BS (Hons) Chemistry Past Papers Semester 1 Chemistry I (Physical Chemistry)

Paper 1:


BS (Hons) Chemistry Past Papers Semester 1 Chemistry I (Physical Chemistry) fscnotes0 Asad Hussain

Written by: Asad Hussain


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